Acquaintances Vs. Friends


Hello everyone! Hope you had a wonderful week. Mine was pretty busy. I was training all week for my new job as an insurance agent. It’s exhausting but fun and can’t wait to get out into the field. Anyway, today’s post is a personal one (no names mentioned), but I hope you all enjoy it. Thanks for reading!  

Friendship at its finest

One thing I miss about being a child is that everyone was my friend. I could talk to and play with anyone because everybody was friends with everybody.You didn’t have to worry about crossing any boundaries with people by talking to others that you liked, but he or she didn’t. But what sucks about growing up is that you start to notice who is really your friend and who’s not. Like they say, ignorance is bliss.

As you grow older, you begin to realize who your friends and acquaintances are. Although it may seem easy to differentiate a friend from an acquaintance, it can be difficult at times. Sometimes our friends turn out to be acquaintances and our acquaintances friends. This can cause a lot of pain, confusion and a lot of unnecessary drama. Trust me, I know. To help you avoid all that, here’s how to tell the difference between a friend and an acquaintance.

When you look up friend and acquaintance in the dictionary, the differences between the two may not be very clear. According to the dictionary, a friend is a person attached to another by feelings of affection or personal regard. A friend is also a person who is on good terms with another and who gives assistance. On the other hand, the dictionary defines an acquaintance as a person known to one, but usually not a close friend.

As you may have guessed, the main difference between a friend and an acquaintance is the level of interaction. Although you may see an acquaintance every day, the interactions between you will be superficial.  With a friend, the level of interaction will be deeper. For example, you have someone at work who you visit from time to time and talk about work, family, weather and occasionally current events. That person is an acquaintance.  You also know someone who lives in another state, but you talk frequently. You discuss family, friends, work, school, the ups and downs of your lives. You share intimate details about your lives. This person should be considered a friend.

Aren't embarrassing pictures of me and my friends cool?

The levels of support also vary in a friendship and acquaintanceship. Although a friend may not agree with or like the things you do, he or she will support you no matter what. An acquaintance on the other hand will only support you if your interests are to his or her liking or his or her own interests. For example, if you wrote a book and held events to promote it, your friends would be there to support you and encourage your endeavor without wanting anything in return. An acquaintance would only support you if they had a personal interest in writing or thought they could benefit off you.

Speaking of personal interests, an acquaintance and friend want two different things out of your relationship. An acquaintanceship is one-sided. As mentioned earlier, an acquaintance is only interested in his or her self. Therefore, he or she may seek one-sided favors from you. They want to receive most the benefits from the relationship, while you receive little to nothing. A friend on the other hand will seek favors, but return them. If you help them out with something, he or she will do the same for you in return.

Not only is a friend there for you emotionally, but he or she is also there for you physically. He or she will spend time with you and physically assist you. An acquaintance may be reluctant to do so.

Writer Richard Bach once said that your friends will know you better in the first minute you meet than your acquaintances will know you in a thousand years. This may be the best thing to judge a friend or an acquaintance by.

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